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The Most Important Marketing Piece You’ll Ever Send

dodl-1The most important marketing piece you’ll ever send is the one following the last one you sent.  If there is no plan for a second, third or fourth piece, there is no point in sending the first one.  This magazine is about providing value to anyone taking the time to read it and there is tremendous value in understanding one of the most important rules of marketing.  Repetition and consistency is the only part of your overall marketing plan that will give you results.  Single-shot marketing absolutely does NOT work, it wastes your money.  The marketing message is lost within seconds of the person taking their eyes off of it.  The good news is that the remedy is easy and the payoff is big when you commit.

It takes a marketing message an average of 33 impressions before it’s remembered. Television commercials aren’t likely to resonate with you until you’ve seen them many times, professional marketers know that, which is why they run the same commercials hundreds of times.   I don’t really watch TV, but I sure know who Flo from the Progressive Insurance ads is because the ads are consistent in their branding, the messaging, humor and the attention to detail. You likely know who I’m speaking of too because you’ve seen the ads so many times as well. If you haven’t seen those ads repeatedly, you would likely have no recollection of them.  The most expensive portion of any marketing campaign is the set-up, so running the same message repeatedly cuts cost substantially and if big companies like Progressive Insurance can run the same ad over and over, so can you.

The United States Postal Service (USPS) reports the average American receives 25 pieces of mail a week.  Your marketing message gets 1/25 of the recipients attention in a weeks worth of mail and over a four week period only only 1%. You must put repetition to work in any marketing medium you want to find success with. The USPS suggests that mailing frequently is what works best for small business marketers according to their research. I also just read a study the Direct Marketing Association put out saying direct-mail marketing is the most effective method of marketing they’ve identified.

In the book The Millionaire Real Estate Agent: (One of my favorite books to recommend for Realtors®), Gary Keller reports that mailing once a month to a list of people you do not personally know (like a real estate farm) will provide results over a period of time. He also reports in his research on millionaire real estate agents that mailing to a sphere of influence and keeping in contact with past clients dramatically increases results. It’s where your biggest return on investment will always be found.

This is MUST READ for anyone looking for direction on finding success in the real estate business.

 

 

Keller found the magic number to be 33 times per year that you need to be in touch with your past client database and sphere of influence for most success. If you were to be in touch with your database once per month via mail and one per month via email, you’ve got 24 knocked off the list.  The rest of those touches could take place over social media, or by picking up the phone and calling.  That’s how the people who are making it big are doing it.  They make sure that any marketing they do is followed by more marketing, they understand when the marketing stops so does the business. They are working their sphere of influence by staying in touch and increasing mind-share by always being present.  They understand that success of the current marketing piece is all about the plan for sending the next marketing piece.

I’m not suggesting you send the same “Thanksgiving postcard” five years in a row or the same home improvement tip postcard month after month. I am suggesting that a marketing piece aimed at branding your image could be mailed over and over again rotated in between other marketing pieces, saving you substantially on marketing costs.

Check out this article on which marketing mediums get the best results according to the Direct Marketing Association.

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